Behavior Management with Love & Logic: Perfect for TPRS!

A couple months ago I lead a professional development session to my colleagues on behavior management. I was surprised that my administration chose me to present, because I’m not a hardass. In fact, I’m kind of the opposite. For the longest time, I saw that as a deficit, that I wasn’t strong enough to tell a kid what’s what. Now I’m discovering is that I can still command the respect of the classroom without getting in a student’s face.

For the session, I decided to share the research I had done on Love and Logic over the summer. Thinking about it more, I realized these strategies truly complement TPRS teaching so I am sharing them with you as well!

Love and Logic is a behavior management strategy that helps create positive and practical solutions to classroom issues that may arise. There are nine essential skills to Love and Logic. Love and Logic fits so well with my philosophy of teaching and I am having great success with it in my classes. It also seems to fit so well TPRS; with the personalization we incorporate, our intent to lower their affective filter and some of the control we share in storyasking.

Thank you to Ms. Sara Boucher for creating these beautiful slides. All credit goes to her and photographer Leo Reynolds. You can find this presentation on this site.

Slide02

Delayed consequences allow you to continue teaching without having to come up with a consequence on the spot. Moreover, it can be particularly scary for the student, which works wonders!
Delayed consequences allow you to continue teaching without having to come up with a consequence on the spot. Moreover, it can be particularly scary for the student, which works wonders!
I use empathy all the time. It helps us see one another has human beings, not adversaries. We gain a mutual respect through empathy.
I use empathy all the time. It helps us see one another has human beings, not adversaries. We gain a mutual respect through empathy.
Find another teacher who has some room in their class. Send a student down and welcome them to come back when they are ready to be a part of the class.
Find another teacher who has some room in their class. Send a student down and welcome them to come back when they are ready to be a part of the class.
We do this ALL the time with TPRS. Whenever we make small-talk in the target language or use PQA, we are creating positive relationships. This goes a long way to creating a loving class community.
We do this ALL the time with TPRS. Whenever we make small-talk in the target language or use PQA, we are creating positive relationships. This goes a long way to creating a loving class community.
I use statements like "I will start the song when the whole class is silent" and "I will dismiss the rows that are straightened and have no garbage on the floor."
I use statements like “I will start the song when the whole class is silent” and “I will dismiss the rows that are straightened and have no garbage on the floor.”
CHOICES are SO POWERFUL. I try to use them all the time. You can use them like you are making a deposit in the bank. Every time you give the class a little choice, you make a deposit. Then, when you need them to do something without giving them a choice, you take out a withdrawal. I also just feel that it keeps students engaged. It gives them a sense of control in what they do. I use small choices like "would you like 5 or 6 minutes on this warm-up?" "Would you like to work in country partners or shoulder partners?" "Do you want to do brain break #1 or #2?"
CHOICES are SO POWERFUL. I try to use them all the time. You can use them like you are making a deposit in the bank. Every time you give the class a little choice, you make a deposit. Then, when you need them to do something without giving them a choice, you take out a withdrawal. I also just feel that it keeps students engaged. It gives them a sense of control in what they do. I use small choices like “would you like 5 or 6 minutes on this warm-up?” “Would you like to work in country partners or shoulder partners?” “Do you want to do brain break #1 or #2?”
Little interventions keep you and the class from boiling over! One I use is "¡Págame!" but I also try to use private interventions, like having a small talk with the student or moving closer to them and staring them down. Another great one is "Would you prefer to sit here and work silently or move to a different part of the room?"
Little interventions keep you and the class from boiling over! One I use is “¡Págame!” but I also try to use private interventions, like having a small talk with the student or moving closer to them and staring them down. Another great one is “Would you prefer to sit here and work silently or move to a different part of the room?”
My go-to line is to sincerely ask, "Well, what do you think you can do about that?"
My go-to line is to sincerely ask, “Well, what do you think you can do about that?”
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4 thoughts on “Behavior Management with Love & Logic: Perfect for TPRS!

  1. I too use Love and Logic. I tried it with little success in my classroom. When my principal saw that I didn’t have a behavior chart, she demanded that I have one. I used it for a little while and tried to go back to Love and Logic, and it was a struggle. I’m going to try again this year. What do you do about posting rules, if anything? I know the only rule you’re supposed to have is: You can do anything you want as long as it doesn’t present a problem. Thanks!

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    1. That is too bad that your principal didn’t understand. Right now, I post a lot of procedures and I post the 4 Agreements. It is not Love & Logic, but it seems to be a good guideline. http://launchbox365.com/the-four-agreements/

      If I were forced to post a behavior plan it would look something like this: “1st disruption: warning, 2nd: private conversation, 3rd: Think Sheet and possible call home, after that, principal or dean intervention” and I would put a little description of why it is beneficial to our class to have these rules… Best of luck to you!

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      1. Thanks for reply. I will use these consequences to post. I was really lost. I’m brand new to TPRS and teaching Spanish. I’ve been a general education teacher for 16 years. I also have never taught at the middle school. I’m a tad bit nervous. Thanks for the support!

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